Don't miss out on the fun of freshers' week

Freshers’ Week is an exciting time for all students as it’s a chance to settle into the university way of life before courses begin.

It will be filled with a mix of social events and ice-breakers, fairs and important administrative tasks to complete.

It is also a great opportunity to get to know your university and make new friends without the pressure of lectures and deadlines.

The week is bound to include Freshers’ Fairs offering the chance for clubs and societies to promote themselves to first-year students.

Don’t be afraid to try out a variety of activities even if you’re not sure it’s something you might like.

Many groups will offer taster sessions for potential new recruits during the first few weeks of term. 

And you never know, something you never thought you would enjoy could end up being a life-long hobby.

The fairs can also be a good place to pick up freebies ranging from pens and sweets to useful money-off vouchers for shops and restaurants – every little bit helps your student budget go further.

Freshers’ Week can also be a good time to sample the local nightlife. Students’ Unions often organise special events aimed at helping first-years get to know each other.

Many bars and clubs will also offer special promotions so it can be the cheapest time for a night out and also a way to bond with your flatmates.

Make the most of this time before your lectures start fully and don’t hide away in your room all the time because you’ll be missing out on an important start to your days at university.

At the same time don’t push yourself to attend absolutely every social event – the main thing is that you finish the week feeling comfortable with your new environment. 

You will no doubt meet lots of people during Freshers’ Week, many of whom you’ll never speak to again, but some may become friends for life.

If you are shy or worried about meeting new people, pick events where there’s actually something to do whether it’s table tennis or rock climbing. 

Focusing on an activity will help you to relax.

Remember everybody is in the same boat so just start chatting with people, share interests and what you’re studying and see what happens. Freshers’ Week is also when you will likely need to take care of official things such as introductions to your course, tours of the campus to help you get your bearings and meeting your lecturers.

It’s also the best time to register at the university health centre which is important to do, even if the queue is a bit off-putting, because you never know when you might need to see a doctor.

If you are hoping to get a job to help fund your studies, then Freshers’ Week is often the time when job fairs are held to showcase the vacancies available on campus and in the surrounding area.

While some students sail through Freshers’ Week without any problems, others will find adjusting to university life more difficult. 

Don’t worry you won’t be the only one experiencing homesickness or feeling anxious.

There will always be someone you can talk to so don’t suffer in silence.

Universities usually have staff or older students on hand to talk to first-years in need of a chat.

Also it’s also worth remembering that it is only one week and there is no rule that says you have to make new friends or join clubs straight away. 

There is plenty of time to do all of this in the weeks and months ahead.

SOME TOP TIPS FOR FRESHERS’ WEEK

Save in advance – with so much going on, your budget for the week is likely to go out of the window so having some extra cash will help ensure you don’t miss out on anything.

Be yourself – you might think it’s the ideal time to reinvent yourself, but people will see straight through and it will be tiring trying to keep up an act.

Sign up to clubs and societies – most universities will likely have hundreds of clubs so you’re bound to find something that interests you and don’t be afraid to try something new.

Fight the homesickness – it might be easier said than done but refrain from talking to people back home as it will make you feel worse. It’s always going to be a shock at first but remember it will get better.

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